West meets East: hybridising Mysore practice & Budokon

In July an new way of practicing Budokon Yoga is starting at my studio ReUnion.  I’m really looking forward to it – it’s a bit of a “West meets East” moment.

Putting together two very different but related yoga methods: Budokon Yoga and Mysore-style instruction. This is (as far as  I know) a completely new concept that has never been tried before. I am excited by the potential of it.

How is this Hybrid going to work?
Practicing the Budokon Yoga Primary Series in a “Mysore” style guided self-practice space.

The Budokon Yoga Primary Series consists of 7 intelligently assembled sections of slow and controlled movements. The techniques are learned through repetition and precision. The emphasis is on the transitions from posture to posture, rather than the holding of postures.

The purpose of these classes is to gain muscular strength, cardiovascular stamina, and joint mobility.

Budokon Yoga is a style of yoga codified and popularized by martial arts and yoga master Cameron Shayne beginning in 2001. Considered a science, art and philosophy which synchronizes classical yoga with, martial arts, calisthenics, animal locomotion and life science, this physically demanding style reshaped classic yoga by integrating signature circular transitions and spinal waves with newly created postures.

Mysore self-practice is the traditional way of practising Ashtanga Yoga and offers a highly personalised approach combined with the group energy of a conventional class.  Here, the teacher will know who you are and your practice inside out. And the best thing is that this “class” is quiet!

Experienced students will turn up and get on with it. Complete beginners will be taught the introductory sections first. When you have memorised the sequence so far and you are competent, then more transitions and parts will be added. If you forget, the teacher and assistant will be there to help you. If there is something you are just not able to do, the teacher will give you an easier version.

The beauty of this method of group practice is that you can show up and leave anytime between 7 and 8.30am.

For beginners, this could be half an hour, and for the more advanced up to an hour and a half. We are beginning with 7am till 8.30 am with a view to expanding a little in the summer months.

It is a wonderful way for beginners and advanced practitioners alike to develop and refine a “take anywhere” self-practice. I have always encouraged people to do home practice even as beginners, and I get a kick out of students who send a pic of their mat rolled out in some exotic outdoor location. But for many, the transition to a daily morning practice doesn’t come easily. There are distractions both internal and external.

Practising in this way opens up space to focus. It’s a feeling of immersion in the practice that makes moments “slow down”. In a regular class setting the voice and ques of the teacher intrude and sometimes interrupt the flow. Practitioners can spend a little longer working at their own pace on aspects that they find challenging. They can repeat things, ask for guidance and may be even be given “homework” drills to practice later.

What we are doing with this is actually helping people to “become their own teacher” and to own the practice.

To sign-up, contact us at my studio: ReUnion Yoga & Medtiation.  We’re running every Monday, Tuesday and Thursday morning in July.  Only R690 for 12 sessions.